Turner’s painting which was considered a fake for a century has been sold for £ 1million at Sotheby’s auction

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A painting by Turner that was considered fake for over a century has been reassigned to the painter – and sold for £ 1million at an auction last week.

The oil painting of Cilgerran Castle in Wales, which is a second version of another painting of the same view by JM W Turner, has left art experts puzzled for over 100 years as to whether it was true or false.

Art scholars have debated the legitimacy of the painting since it was exhibited at the Guildhall in 1899.

It was eventually agreed that the painting was likely created early in Turner’s career, but that it featured alterations that were more reminiscent of the later years of his life.

Through years of research and modern technology, experts were able to conclude that Turner himself had altered the board, the Telegraph reported.

An oil painting of Cilgerran Castle in Wales by JWW Turner, pictured, which was considered a forgery for over a century, has been reassigned to the master – and it sold for £ 1million at a Sotheby’s auction this week

And the work has now been sold for £ 1million at an Old Masters evening auction at Sotheby’s.

It took three years to verify the authenticity of the painting, said Julian Gascoigne, senior specialist in British paintings at Sotheby’s.

The auction house first appraised the painting for its previous owner, and the team decided that the work needed further examination and should be compared to the original to confirm its authenticity.

Ian Warrell, a Turner expert, inspected the two paintings at Cragside and concluded that they were probably created “by the same hand”.

Turner, shown in an 1867 drawing, purchased the painting by proxy, modified it, and resold it

Turner, shown in an 1867 drawing, purchased the painting by proxy, modified it, and resold it

Mr Gascoigne said: “The last piece of the puzzle… was that this photo was purchased in 1827 from Sir John Fleming Leicester, an incredibly important collector who had purchased the photo years earlier, by Turner himself.

At the time of purchase, Turner was repurchasing some of his works with the idea of ​​donating them to the state.

Turner had hired an agent to redeem the work, resulting in a different name in the catalog.

Warrell discovered a newspaper article from the time revealing that it was Turner who purchased the painting by proxy in 1827.

Gascoigne revealed that Turner, who was at an advanced stage in his life when he bought the painting, set out to rectify aspects of it he was not happy with.

After making the modification, Turner sold it to his patron, Hugh Andrew Johnstone, Munro of Novar.

In order to affirm the authenticity of the painting, the Sotheby’s team used a specialized X-ray fluorescence machine to map its elements and components of their painting.

The painting, shown, was purchased by Turner later in his life and he set out to rectify aspects of his earlier work that he was not happy with.

The painting, shown, was purchased by Turner later in his life and he set out to rectify aspects of his earlier work that he was not happy with.

They cross-checked the information with their research and were able to confirm that the painting was indeed from Turner.

Advances in technology have helped experts uncover the hidden stories of some of the most revered painters.

In October, a hidden Picasso painting of a crouching nude woman that sits under one of his other works was reconstructed by scientists using artificial intelligence and three-dimensional printing.

The team at University College London (UCL) said their unique replica of “The Lonesome Crouching Nude” would ensure the work was no longer “erased from history”.

Experts believe that Picasso painted over the work with some reluctance in order to reuse the expensive canvas at a time, early in his career, when he was relatively poor.

The original was first revealed under the work of Picasso at the end of 1903 “The Blind’s Meal” – a reformulation of the Christian sacrament – by X-ray fluorescence analyzes in 2010.

Its discovery ended a long search for the lost work, known for its depiction in the background of “La Vie”, a contemporary oil painting by Picasso.

All three works are from the artist’s “blue period” from 1901 to 1904, all of which were monochrome and inspired in part by the suicide of his friend Carles Casagemas, as well as Picasso’s travels through Spain.

‘The Blind Man’s Meal’ – and the earlier work it contains – is currently in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

This is not the first lost work recreated by researchers. Previously, they had reproduced a portrait of a woman hidden under the “Portrait of a Girl” by Amedeo Modigliani from 1917.

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