Painting Unequal Parity – The New Indian Express

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Express press service

BENGALURU: The dawn of October saw many of us queuing to board flights or trains to the land of the rasgullas. Tired of Singapore’s Kodaikanal tours where the only visit you can make these days is to observe a thousand other tourists, travelers eager for experiences are turning to the field of art and culture that never fails to surprise.

And what better way to soak up a bit of this culture than to visit the Grand Matriarch of all Durga Puja in Kolkata. Beautifully decorated idols of the goddess Durga, the female embodiment of strength and the protective mother of the universe, are placed on temporary stages called pandals and worshiped for 10 days. A spectacular sight indeed, but aren’t we oceans away from the realities on the ground of how women are treated around the world.

We have undoubtedly come a long way since the days when a woman’s place was in the kitchen. Today, she is everywhere. From airplane cockpits to the most powerful corporate cabins, women have occupied spaces unthinkable a few decades ago. And yes, his art is also slowly emerging. For centuries, like most other fields, art has been a male bastion.

The creative urges were not lost on women, as you can perhaps conclude, but the prevailing conditions did not allow it to flourish. Women were not allowed into art institutions and when they were finally accepted, restrictions were placed on them preventing them from using nude models as reference, thus making it nearly impossible to paint anatomically correct bodies. Also, until the 18th century, history paintings dominated and female artists were at a disadvantage as they had to conform to social expectations of painting family scenes.

Is the art world fairer for women? In 1984, a group of anonymous female artists in America, calling themselves the Guerilla Girls and wearing gorilla masks to cover their identity, decided to speak out against the injustice of gender discrimination in art. Their intense research revealed shocking disparities, from the pay gaps between men and women in the art industry to the opportunities presented to showcase their art. These facts were made public by printing strongly worded posters that could not be ignored.

Their sarcastic statements like “When racism and sexism are out of fashion, what will your art collection be worth?” and “The Perks of Being a Female Artist: Working Without the Pressure of Success”, have embarrassed art power centers and conscious changes have been made over time by museums and galleries to right these wrongs. .

Absolute parity, however, seems a distant dream. A study of 8,20,000 exhibitions worldwide in 2018 showed that only a third featured women. Male artists continue to sell for astronomical sums at auction with female artists barely on the horizon. It is indeed a miracle that despite the odds against them, many female artists have achieved greatness. The time has now come to allow women to inscribe their name in the history of the art of tomorrow. May Durga overcome the prejudices that stood like insurmountable walls on the path to success.

BENGALURU: The dawn of October saw many of us queuing to board flights or trains to the land of the rasgullas. Tired of Singapore’s Kodaikanal tours where the only visit you can make these days is to observe a thousand other tourists, travelers eager for experiences are turning to the field of art and culture that never fails to surprise. And what better way to soak up a bit of this culture than to visit the Grand Matriarch of all Durga Puja in Kolkata. Beautifully decorated idols of the goddess Durga, the female embodiment of strength and the protective mother of the universe, are placed on temporary stages called pandals and worshiped for 10 days. A spectacular sight indeed, but aren’t we oceans away from the realities on the ground of how women are treated around the world. We have undoubtedly come a long way since the days when a woman’s place was in the kitchen. Today, she is everywhere. From airplane cockpits to the most powerful corporate cabins, women have occupied spaces unthinkable a few decades ago. And yes, his art is also slowly emerging. For centuries, like most other fields, art has been a male bastion. Creative urges were not lost on women, as you might conclude, but prevailing conditions did not allow it to flourish. Women were not allowed into art institutions and when they were eventually accepted, restrictions were placed on them preventing them from using nude models as reference, thus making it almost impossible to paint anatomically correct bodies. Also, until the 18th century, history paintings were dominant and female artists were at a disadvantage as they had to conform to social expectations of painting family scenes. Is the art world fairer for women? In 1984, a group of anonymous female artists in America, calling themselves the Guerilla Girls and wearing gorilla masks to cover their identity, decided to speak out against the injustice of gender discrimination in art. Their intense research revealed shocking disparities, from the pay gaps between men and women in the art industry to the opportunities presented to showcase their art. These facts were made public by printing strongly worded posters that could not be ignored. Their sarcastic statements like “When racism and sexism are out of fashion, what will your art collection be worth?” and “The Benefits of Being a Female Artist: Working Without the Pressure of Success”, have embarrassed art power centers and conscious changes have been made over time by museums and galleries to right these wrongs. . Absolute parity, however, seems a distant dream. A study of 8,20,000 exhibitions worldwide in 2018 showed that only a third featured women. Male artists continue to sell for astronomical sums at auction with female artists barely on the horizon. It is indeed a miracle that despite the odds against them, many female artists have achieved greatness. The time has now come to allow women to inscribe their name in the history of the art of tomorrow. May Durga overcome the prejudices that stood like insurmountable walls on the path to success.

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